Peter Kennaugh Signing

Peter Kennaugh and young fan

Peter Kennaugh and young fan

Here’s some pictures of Manx Olympic Gold Medallist, Peter Kennaugh‘s Stamp signing session down at the Isle of Man Sea Terminal which happened on Sunday 23rd Sept 2012.  The event was a roaring success and was organised by The Isle of Man Post Office.

Signing

Signing

Peter Kennaugh Meeting The Manx Public

Peter Kennaugh Meeting The Manx Public

Manx Olympic Gold Medalist Peter Kennaugh and Mirella Annis, marketing assistant, Isle of Man Stamps & Coins

Manx Olympic Gold Medalist Peter Kennaugh and Mirella Annis, marketing assistant, Isle of Man Stamps & Coins

 Team GB Manx Olympic Gold Medalist Peter Kennaugh

Team GB Manx Olympic Gold Medalist Peter Kennaugh

Busy Crowd

Busy Crowd

Peter Kennaugh with Mirella Annis and Dot Tilbury

L-R Peter Kennaugh with Mirella Annis, marketing assistant and Dot Tilbury, general manager both from Isle of Man Stamps & Coins

Men’s Team Pursuit Gold Medal Winners Sheet

Paul Smith Olympics Gold Medal Winners Sheet

Men’s Team Pursuit Gold Medal Winners Sheet

 Isle of Man Post Office is delighted to issue a Gold Medal Winners Sheet in celebration of the success of the Men’s Team Pursuit in the London 2012 Olympic Games, which saw Manx-born Peter Kennaugh as part of the team. Just 2012 numbered sheets will be printed.

Peter Kenanugh, along with team mates Steven Burke, Edward Clancy and Geraint Thomas  won the gold medal in a dramatic race in which they set a new world record time of  03:51.659. Team GB were tipped as the favorites and confirmed this position in qualifying.

Peter is the first Manx-born Olympic Champion since Sidney Swann, who was part of Great Britain’s rowing eights team at the 1912 Games in Stockholm.

The Gold Medal Winners Sheet features the cycling stamps of Isle of Man Post Office’s London 2012 Olympic Games stamp issue, designed by world-renowned fashion designer Sir Paul Smith, along with images of Peter and his team mates taking part in the race.

Less than 24 hours after he rode to victory in the team pursuit, Peter arrived back on the Isle of Man to a hero’s welcome.  A huge crowd cheered as he walked through the arrivals area of the Isle of Man Airport holding his gold medal. Peter also joined in with an impromptu rendition of the Island’s national anthem followed by an emotional speech in which he expressed his thanks for the reception. He held his gold medal aloft which prompted an enormous cheer from the crowd that included fans of all ages. He spent an hour signing autographs and having his photograph taken and passed his gold medal to fans – much to the delight of the many children who turned up to meet their hero.

The Winners Sheet priced £10.00 including free world-wide delivery, can be ordered now for delivery from www.iomstamps.com

Bee Fauna Of The Isle Of Man

Bee Fauna Of The Isle Of Man

Click On The Image For More Information

The Isle of Man Post Office is pleased to present this beautiful stamp issue dedicated to one of our most popular and beloved insects and recognising its crucial role in the life cycle of the natural world.

Apart from the honeybee, the Isle of Man is home to approximately 15 species of bumblebee and 57 species of solitary bee. To put this into perspective, currently there are known to be 24 species of bumblebees and over 200 solitary bee species recorded from the British Isles. On the Island these bees can be found foraging from flowers on our mountain moorlands where the lovely Bilberry Bumblebee, amongst several other bee species, can be found visiting bilberry and heather flowers, right down to the Island’s coastal fringes where a number of bees make a living on the Ayres and the soft cliffs of Ramsey Bay for example.

Most of us will be familiar with some of the various species of bumblebees that visit our garden flower beds, but the solitary bees will be less familiar and it may be only when they are nesting in our lawns or flower beds that we may notice them. They are called solitary because, unlike the honey and bumble bees, there is no worker caste and they do not live in colonies although they can form large nesting aggregations such as those of Colletes succinctus.

Bee Fauna Of The Isle Of Man - First Day Cover

Click On The Image For More Information

Other solitary bees, known as cuckoo bees, forgo the labour of building and provisioning their own nests but sneak their eggs into the nests of other bees and where they develop and eliminate their competition for the nest’s provisions. The silver and white Epeolus variegatus is one such cuckoo bee which can be found on the Ayres where it takes advantage of the efforts of bees such as species of the genus Colletes.

On the Isle of Man there are in the region of 120 beekeepers with varying numbers of colonies, 100 of them are fully paid-up Members of the IOM Beekeepers Federation affiliated to the BBKA, comprising of three districts. It is estimated that there are at least 400 colonies kept by these beekeepers or the Bumblebee Conservation Trust.

Bee Fauna Of The Isle Of Man - Presentation Pack

Click On The Image For More Information

These images are so life-like you can almost smell the honey as this issue is made extra special printed on honey-scented paper.
Please visit our website at www.iomstamps.com to find out more about the Bee Fauna of the Isle of Man collection of stamps and products and to pre-order.

Harbour Lights – Minor Lighthouses of the Isle of Man: A Guiding Light…

Tracey Dean Interviewed by Paul Moulton for MT TVHarbour Lights – Minor Lighthouses of the Isle of Man: A Guiding Light...

The Isle of Man Post Office is pleased to present Harbour Lights, a set of six stamps depicting minor lighthouses around the Isle of Man. We commissioned local artist Tracey Dean to prepare new paintings which truly capture the elegance of the familiar landmarks.
Local historian Stan Basnett writes:
The principal Lighthouses around the Isle of Man are maintained by the Commissioners of Northern Lights and are not the only lighthouses around the Island. Each harbour being protected by minor lights erected on the extremities of piers and breakwaters many of which are also being fitted with an audible device such as a horn or bell for use in fog.

Harbour Lights – Minor Lighthouses of the Isle of Man A Guiding Light
When built their purpose was vital to vessels entering harbour at night or in restricted visibility.
Their importance has since diminished through the use of modern equipment such as radar and GPS. They still however have a useful part to play as an aid to navigation. Prior to the Revestment Act of 1765 the responsibility for the Island’s harbours lay with the Duke of Atholland the Island’s Government. After that date the harbours came under the control of the Admiralty and the Crown. Ultimately they reverted to the Isle of Man Harbour Commissioners and still remain the responsibility of the Manx Government through the Department of Infrastructure
The outer harbour at Castletown is protected by a small breakwater on the end of which is a superb limestone built lighthouse. It carries an inscription that clearly states that it was built in AD 1849 at which time Castletown was the capital of the Island and the harbour was more important than now. The lighthouse displays an occulting red light every 15 seconds and is visible for 8 miles. The approach to the inner harbour carries a smaller “pepper pot” lighthouse displaying an occulting red light every 4 seconds visible for 4 miles.

Harbour Lights – Minor Lighthouses of the Isle of Man A Guiding Light

This stamp depicts the lighthouse on the end of the Battery Pier at Douglas, which was completed in 1876 and formed the outer breakwater for the harbour. The light exhibited alternate white and red lights every 15 seconds and had a bell fog signal of one ring every 2 seconds. When a new breakwater was completed in 1983 a new light was erected on an unpretentious metal mast and as a result the original light now displays a considerably reduced quick flashing red light.
The harbour at Laxey owes its origin to the lead mining industry. Responsibility for it passed to the IOM Harbour Commissioners in 1890 who then commenced work on the construction of a breakwater which was completed in 1893. The stone built lighthouse on the seaward end exhibits an occulting green light every 3 seconds visible for 7 miles. The smaller inner light on the end of Rowe’s Pier displays an occulting red light every 3 seconds also visible for 7 miles.

Harbour Lights – Minor Lighthouses of the Isle of Man: A Guiding Light

Peel harbour is protected by five lights and the one depicted on this stamp is the oldest and located on the outer breakwater which was completed in 1896. It is an elegant octagonal cast iron structure erected on the raised head at the extremity of the breakwater. It displays a white occulting light every 7 seconds and is visible for 11 miles. It did have a fog signal in the form of a bell giving 4 rings every 12 seconds.
The harbour entrance at Ramsey has a channel trained between two piers. The South Pier was extended in 1876 and the stamp depicts the hexagonal cast iron lighthouse erected at its seaward end. It displays an occulting red light every 5 seconds and is visible for 8 miles. As the channel is effectively a navigable channel the North Pier exhibits a green light as an aid to ships entering the port. In the background is the Ramsey Queen’s Pier, now disused, which was built as a low water landing pier.
The harbour at Port St Mary has two piers. The Alfred Pier completed in 1886 protects the outer harbour and until recently carried one of the elegant hexagonal cast iron lighthouses but a severe storm washed it off the pier and it has been replaced with a light on a steel post. The drying inner harbour is protected by the Quay which is a much earlier structure and carries its original lighthouse, depicted on the stamp, which exhibits an occulting red light every 3 seconds visible for 8 miles.
Please visit our website at www.iomstamps.com to find out more about our stamps and products.